Combining impartiality with a moral imperative will make your argument more persuasive than facts alone.

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Here’s an interesting fact: speakers lose credibility when they attempt to persuade an audience of a point of view. Why? Because they are perceived to lack impartiality.

Rather than trying to persuade, speakers should focus on discussing, teaching, and sharing information. This impartiality sends an important message: that your intentions are trustworthy. Neutral motivation boosts communicator credibility – and, ironically, makes an argument more persuasive.

If you want to persuade, research suggests you should focus less on the data and more on your role as messenger. Acknowledge and empathize with people’s underlying fears. Don't criticize opponents for their ignorance. Instead, discuss objectively. Speak to larger outcomes (like protecting human welfare) that move the conversation out of people's heads and into people's hearts. Combining impartiality with a moral imperative -- and presenting yourself as a friend to the audience -- will make your argument more persuasive than facts alone.

How persuasive are you?   

Joni Avram